• Do I Need Snow Tires if I Have AWD?

    You can probably safely drive your AWD (all-wheel-drive) with all-season tires in light or moderate snow. But it’s a common misperception that AWDs will drive like tanks in slick conditions.

    It’s recommended that you have either winter tires or snow chains on your AWD if you’re driving in a blizzard or icy conditions. Traveling with summer or worn all-season tires on any vehicle in winter is a safety risk. Even a 4WD (four-wheel-drive) will slip and slide on snowy roads if its tires don’t have enough tread.


    What AWD Does Really Well in Snow

    AWD is great at getting your car moving from a dead stop and accelerating smoothly in a straight line when the pavement is slippery. It’s able to do this because it sends more power to whichever wheels are getting the most traction and less power to the spinning wheels.

    But if you don’t have enough traction in the first place, the AWD system can’t compensate. If none of the four tires has enough grip, you’re in trouble.

    This is why an AWD equipped with all-season tires might not deliver safe braking and sharp cornering in significant snow or on ice. In fact, some independent testing shows that a front-wheel-drive (FWD) mounted with winter tires will have shorter stopping distance and better cornering than an AWD with all-season tires.


    How Winter Tires Provide Better Traction

    To be clear, what some people call snow tires are, in fact, winter tires built for better road grip in ALL winter conditions — rain, ice, snow and slush.

    Winter tires are made with specialized rubber that stays softer during cold temperatures. They’re designed with tread features like bigger grooves, biting edges, sipes, optional studs and variations in the block shapes for improved gripping even in subzero temperatures.

    Differences between all-season and winter tires graphic

    All-season and summer tires are made with a different rubber compound so they will maintain their shape even on hot pavement. They don’t have as many jagged surfaces and have fewer or shallower channels for ejecting water or snow.


    Are Winter Tires Worth it for AWD Vehicles?

    AWD is helpful when you’re starting to move or accelerating on slick roads, but not so much when you’re cornering or stopping. It’s not a substitute for having winter tires.

    If you’re only visiting snowy areas once or twice a year, you may be fine driving an AWD with all-season tires in good condition. Just be sure to carry tire chains.

    If it’s frigid where you live or you’re traveling in more than light snow every month, then buying a set of winter tires for your AWD will deliver the road grip you need for most winter weather conditions. Of course, you may also need a set of good chains for the worst weather.



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  • How Do I Check My Tire Pressure?

    Low tire pressure can be an expensive proposition, costing you hundreds of dollars a year in lost fuel economy and prematurely worn tires. Add to that, decreased handling and an increased risk in tire failure, and it’s easy to understand why maintaining proper tire pressure is so important. Tires naturally lose 1 to 2 pounds of pressure a month. Cool temperatures cause even more pressure loss. So it’s important to check your vehicle’s tire pressure regularly.

    We recommend you check your tire pressure at least once a month or twice a month in the winter.


    Using an Air Pressure Gauge

    Here’s how you go about it with an air pressure gauge, can be found at most any auto parts store.

    Standard cold tire inflation pressure information

    First, look in the owner’s manual or on the inside placard of the driver’s side door for the standard cold tire inflation pressure. This number is the PSI, or Pounds Per Square Inch, you will inflate your tires to, as suggested by the car’s manufacturer.

    Next, unscrew the cap from the valve stem on the tire.

    Tech checks tire pressure

    Now, press the air pressure gauge onto the valve stem and record the reading given. If there’s a hissing sound, try re-seating the gauge for a tighter fit and more accurate reading. Note that if the reading on all four tires is the same as the manual’s specifications, you’re done. If any of the tires have inadequate pressure, add air until they’re properly filled. Make sure you put in the correct amount by rechecking the pressure in each tire after refilling.

    Finally, replace the valve stem cap to protect the valve mechanism from dirt and moisture.

    While you’re at it, check the pressure on your spare tire, as well. You never know when you might need it.

    Follow along as we show you how in this video:


    Or you can simply stop by your nearest Les Schwab Tire Center, where we not only check tire pressure for you but also adjust it, if necessary. Free of charge.

    Have any questions about tire pressure? One of our experts will be happy to help.

  • How to Change a Tire

    Changing a flat tire isn’t rocket science, but there are some important things to know to make sure you get that spare on properly in order to make it safely to the tire shop. Follow along as we show you, step by step, how to do it in this Les Schwab Quick Tips video. We cover:

    1. What to do before you get tools out.

    2. How to find the proper jacking point on your vehicle.

    3. How much to loosen lug nuts before lifting the car.

    4. How to make sure the spare goes on correctly.

    5. The proper order for tightening lug nuts.


    How to Change a Tire

    1. Safety first. Keep clear of passing traffic, make sure your car is in park, set your parking brake and turn on your hazard lights. If there’s any doubt about whether you can stay out of harm’s way, it’s better to call roadside assistance.

    2. Check your owner’s manual. It should have tire-changing instructions, including the location of the jacking point.

    3. Get your spare and tools out. They are usually stored in a compartment inside the trunk. There should also be instructions on how to use the jack.

    4. Be sure the jack is positioned properly. Make sure it’s pointed the right way and placed in the proper jacking point on the vehicle.

    5. Loosen lug nuts about a one-quarter turn before jacking.

    6. Jack the vehicle up enough so the tire is not touching the ground.

    7. Remove the lug nuts, setting them somewhere where they won’t roll away.

    8. Pull the flat tire off, placing it underneath your vehicle behind the jack or, if it’s too wide to fit there, in another spot under the auto if possible. This is important in case the vehicle falls off the jack.

    9. Put the spare on, making sure the valve stem is facing you.

    10. Screw the lugs nuts back on by hand, finger tight.

    11. Lower the jack down until the tire contacts the road and is bearing some weight, but not all the way.

    12. Tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern, not a circle pattern, so the wheel gets seated snugly. This assures the wheel isn’t askew, and doesn’t then pop into the proper place while you’re going down the road, loosening some of the bolts and causing wobbling or worse — like the nuts breaking and the wheel coming off.
    Proper order for four lug nuts.
    Proper order for five lug nuts.
Proper order for six lug nuts.
Proper order for eight lug nuts.