• 4 Reasons Not to Drive Winter Tires Through Summer

    If you’re thinking of driving on your winter tires year-round, there’s a strong case against it. You’ll wear out your tires much faster. You’ll compromise traction and handling in all four seasons. And changing out your tires twice a year doesn’t have to cost you anything, including your valuable time. Here’s what you should know.


    1. Winter Tires Wear Out Faster in the Heat

    Winter tires are made with a more flexible rubber compound that helps deliver the best road grip in snowy and icy conditions. Most all-season tires are made with a harder rubber blend that can withstand hot weather.

    Differences between all-season and winter tires

    Heat is really hard on winter tires, which are meant to be used when temperatures are 45°F or below. Winter tires run on hot pavement will wear out much faster than their expected tread life. Because they are made with a softer compound, they will also tend to wear unevenly when driven in the wrong conditions.


    2. It Will Cost You, Not Save You Money

    Since winter tires typically cost more than all-season tires, using them all year means you’re wearing out a more expensive set much faster than its expected mileage life. It’s smarter to buy two sets of tires made for your driving conditions and swap them when the weather changes.

    You’ll also pay more for gas when you use winter tires in summer. On hot blacktop, they roll with far more friction than tires built for warm weather.

    This higher rolling resistance means worse fuel economy — and more out of your pocket at the pump. It doesn’t do any favors for Mother Nature either since you’ll be contributing higher carbon emissions from using more gas.

    As with any investment, you save money when you get the most value from your tires. One way to get the longest life out of tires is to use them for what they’re made for.


    3. Traction and Handling Issues

    Take it from Click and Clack of Car Talk:

    Stopping distance is also a big issue since winter tires require a bit longer for braking on wet or dry pavement.

    Stopping during a rainstorm.

    Plus, when cold weather comes around again, you’re going to be relying on worn tires. Tires designed for winter will get uneven shoulder wear and faster tread wear if used in the summer months.

    Winter tires with worn tread blocks don’t provide as much grip on icy, snowy surfaces. Without deep grooves and intact traction features, your tires won’t channel snow, slush and water as well. When it comes to traction, lack of tread depth is a bigger safety risk in winter.


    4. Swapping Tires Can Be Easy and Free

    Swapping out winter tires for all-season or performance tires twice a year is only a big effort if you do it yourself. The best tire shops do it for free as long as your tires are on wheels. If not, you can generally pay a small fee to have it done with little waiting.


    The Bottom Line on Driving Winter Tires All Year

    Convertible with hot pooch in summer

    Your overall cost per mile will be lowest when you drive on tires that are proper for the season and your driving conditions. You’ll get the most mileage out of them along with the control and traction you’ve paid for. And you’ll be more secure on the road.


    Shop for Summer Tires
  • How Do I Check My Tire Pressure?

    Low tire pressure can be an expensive proposition, costing you hundreds of dollars a year in lost fuel economy and prematurely worn tires. Add to that, decreased handling and an increased risk in tire failure, and it’s easy to understand why maintaining proper tire pressure is so important. Tires naturally lose 1 to 2 pounds of pressure a month. Cool temperatures cause even more pressure loss. So it’s important to check your vehicle’s tire pressure regularly.

    We recommend you check your tire pressure at least once a month or twice a month in the winter.


    Using an Air Pressure Gauge

    Here’s how you go about it with an air pressure gauge, can be found at most any auto parts store.

    Standard cold tire inflation pressure information

    First, look in the owner’s manual or on the inside placard of the driver’s side door for the standard cold tire inflation pressure. This number is the PSI, or Pounds Per Square Inch, you will inflate your tires to, as suggested by the car’s manufacturer.

    Next, unscrew the cap from the valve stem on the tire.

    Tech checks tire pressure

    Now, press the air pressure gauge onto the valve stem and record the reading given. If there’s a hissing sound, try re-seating the gauge for a tighter fit and more accurate reading. Note that if the reading on all four tires is the same as the manual’s specifications, you’re done. If any of the tires have inadequate pressure, add air until they’re properly filled. Make sure you put in the correct amount by rechecking the pressure in each tire after refilling.

    Finally, replace the valve stem cap to protect the valve mechanism from dirt and moisture.

    While you’re at it, check the pressure on your spare tire, as well. You never know when you might need it.

    Follow along as we show you how in this video:


    Or you can simply stop by your nearest Les Schwab Tire Center, where we not only check tire pressure for you but also adjust it, if necessary. Free of charge.

    Have any questions about tire pressure? One of our experts will be happy to help.

  • How to Change a Tire

    Changing a flat tire isn’t rocket science, but there are some important things to know to make sure you get that spare on properly in order to make it safely to the tire shop. Follow along as we show you, step by step, how to do it in this Les Schwab Quick Tips video. We cover:

    1. What to do before you get tools out.

    2. How to find the proper jacking point on your vehicle.

    3. How much to loosen lug nuts before lifting the car.

    4. How to make sure the spare goes on correctly.

    5. The proper order for tightening lug nuts.


    How to Change a Tire

    1. Safety first. Keep clear of passing traffic, make sure your car is in park, set your parking brake and turn on your hazard lights. If there’s any doubt about whether you can stay out of harm’s way, it’s better to call roadside assistance.

    2. Check your owner’s manual. It should have tire-changing instructions, including the location of the jacking point.

    3. Get your spare and tools out. They are usually stored in a compartment inside the trunk. There should also be instructions on how to use the jack.

    4. Be sure the jack is positioned properly. Make sure it’s pointed the right way and placed in the proper jacking point on the vehicle.

    5. Loosen lug nuts about a one-quarter turn before jacking.

    6. Jack the vehicle up enough so the tire is not touching the ground.

    7. Remove the lug nuts, setting them somewhere where they won’t roll away.

    8. Pull the flat tire off, placing it underneath your vehicle behind the jack or, if it’s too wide to fit there, in another spot under the auto if possible. This is important in case the vehicle falls off the jack.

    9. Put the spare on, making sure the valve stem is facing you.

    10. Screw the lugs nuts back on by hand, finger tight.

    11. Lower the jack down until the tire contacts the road and is bearing some weight, but not all the way.

    12. Tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern, not a circle pattern, so the wheel gets seated snugly. This assures the wheel isn’t askew, and doesn’t then pop into the proper place while you’re going down the road, loosening some of the bolts and causing wobbling or worse — like the nuts breaking and the wheel coming off.
    Proper order for four lug nuts.
    Proper order for five lug nuts.
Proper order for six lug nuts.
Proper order for eight lug nuts.