• What Is Rolling Resistance?

    Rolling resistance is the combination of forces that work against the forward motion of your vehicle. The weight of the vehicle, gravity and inertia, the amount of friction between the tires and the road surface, and air drag all play a part. When you coast in your car or on a bike, rolling resistance is what slows you down. The more rolling resistance, the more power it takes to propel a vehicle. Between 3 and 11 percent of the gas used in passenger vehicles goes to overcoming this force, so reducing it means saving on gas.

    Since tires contribute to between 15 and 25 percent of a vehicle’s overall rolling resistance — depending on how fast you’re going, vehicle type and road surface — they are a significant factor in gas economy.


    What Are Low-Rolling-Resistance Tires?

    Think of coasting with your foot off the gas. If you have a cargo carrier on the roof, your vehicle will slow down quicker (air drag and extra weight). If you’re going downhill, you pick up speed (gravity). If your tires are low on air or the ground is soft, you’ll stop sooner (more friction with the road). Eventually, you come to a halt due to rolling resistance.

    Here is what happens as a tire goes through each revolution. As a tire rolls under a vehicle’s weight, it flattens a bit at the contact patch (where it touches the road) then recovers its roundness as it circles. This consumes energy and creates heat. Fuel (either gasoline, diesel or EV battery power) is used to compensate for this lost energy.

    Low-rolling-resistance tires strike a balance between safety features that helps control and stop the car, and design elements that provide better gas mileage. These tires:

    • Weigh less and have thinner sidewalls.
    • Are made with rubber compounds that reduce heat and friction.
    • Have tread designs with shallower tread depth.

    These types of tires are one way auto and tire manufacturers are trying to improve fuel efficiency.


    How Much Does Tire Choice Affect Fuel Economy?

    A 2005 Transportation Research Board study looked at the differences in fuel consumption and tire life if passenger car owners opted for low-rolling-resistance tires. The results? A 10 percent reduction of average rolling resistance was feasible, would not result in significant safety issues and would increase the fuel economy of American passenger vehicles by 1 to 2 percent. This would mean saving about 1 billion to 2 billion gallons of fuel per year, the equivalent of taking 2 million to 4 million cars and light trucks off the road.

    They also found that tires offering the best wet traction were often higher in rolling resistance. Every tire type offers a tradeoff in road grip, handling, noise, wear resistance, appearance, price and gas mileage. Tires with worn tread may have less rolling resistance due to shallow, smoother tread but might be unsafe to drive on, for example.

    The desire to reduce rolling resistance has to be balanced with considerations like air pressure, road conditions, climate, driving style and the vehicle type.


    What To Do for More Fuel-Efficient Tires

    According to the EPA, there are ways to get better fuel economy no matter what type of tire you have mounted. By keeping your tires properly inflated, you can improve gas mileage by about 3 percent. Also, get your tires rotated regularly so the tread wears evenly. Remember that worn tread will have lower rolling resistance, so you may notice a slight decrease in fuel economy when you replace tires.


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  • Does Hitting a Pothole Damage My Tires?

    Hitting a pothole is never fun. But those holes in the road can do more than spill your latte. Potholes can puncture your tire or bend or crack your wheel. It can damage your tire’s sidewall or belts. Even a minor impact may knock your vehicle out of alignment. A pothole strike can damage your shocks or struts, or harm your suspension.

    Give Your Vehicle a Quick Inspection

    After hitting a pothole, check for any of the following signs of pothole damage.

    1. A bulge on the tire sidewall. This is an indicator that the tire was pinched between the edge of the pothole and the wheel causing the internal plies to be weakened or severed.

    2. Your steering wheel is no longer centered or the vehicle wants to pull to one side or the other. The impact may have been hard enough to affect the alignment or damage a steering or suspension component.

    3. You feel abnormal vibrations in the steering, seat or floor.

    4. You may hear a new noise when underway. Something may have been bent or displaced and could be rubbing on the tire/wheel assembly.

    5. A dashboard warning light appears.

    How Badly Can Potholes Damage My Vehicle?

    Hitting a pothole can cause bent wheel rims, internal tire damage, alignment problems, and shock and strut issues depending on the severity of the impact. This doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll puncture your tires or damage your vehicle, but if you have any concerns, get it inspected.

    Below are some photos that show how potholes can damage wheels or rims.

    Wheel damage from potholes
    Wheel damage from potholes

    Tire damage from potholes
    Tire damage from potholes

    When you take your vehicle to a tire technician or mechanic following a pothole impact, ask for an inspection that covers:

    • Wheels/steering knocked out of alignment
    • Damage to the tire’s steel belts
    • Intact tire balancing weights
    • Bent or cracked wheel rim
    • Damage to shocks and struts
    • Other broken suspension components

    Tips to Minimize Pothole Damage

    With summer and winter weather throughout the West impacting our roads, potholes are going to happen. Here’s what you can do to minimize the damage and possibly avoid these hazards.

    1. Always drive on tires that are properly inflated and in good condition. This will give you the best chance of absorbing the impact safely.

    2. Drive defensively. Slow down when you’re on an unfamiliar or rough road, and avoid distracted driving.

    3. Be alert to what’s ahead, and make sure you keep enough distance between you and the vehicle in front of you so you can avoid issues.

    4. Recognize that though you might miss the first pothole, there may be another waiting.

    5. When you can’t avoid a pothole, take your foot off the gas and hold your steering wheel tightly. Don’t brake. This will allow you to maintain the most control during the impact.

    Les Schwab Has Experience with Pothole Damage

    Our pros have seen plenty of pothole damage and can offer recommendations, including tire repair and replacement, alignment work, and more. Stop by your local Les Schwab for a free inspection. If you need new tires, wheels or alignment, we’ll help get you and your family quickly and safely back on the road.

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  • Replacing Just Two Tires? Install Them on the Back.

    All tires wear differently depending on how, where, what you drive. If two of your tires wear out faster, it may only be necessary to replace those two instead of replacing all four. If you do, it’s important to have the two new tires installed on the back and the partially worn tires moved to the front – even on front-wheel-drive vehicles. Here’s why.

    Les Schwab Tip: When possible, we recommend replacing all four tires at once for a better grip on the road. This is especially true for all-wheel-drive vehicles where differences in tread depth can cause vehicle damage. See our article Should You Replace All Four Tires on Your AWD Vehicle for more information.


    Wet and Icy/Snow-Covered Roads Happen

    Wherever you live in the west, rain and snow create potential hazards when your tire tread is worn. Installing two new tires on the front or back can have a significant impact on how your vehicle reacts when traction is compromised. This could also be an issue on roads that have less traction, including dirt and gravel.

    Oversteer illustration when two new tires are installed on the front.


    A Word on Hydroplaning

    The first 10 minutes of a light rain are some of the most dangerous moments for hydroplaning. This happens when the tread on your tires cannot channel the water away fast enough and loses contact with the road. There are other factors, such as speed, vehicle weight, and tire pressure. But overall, it comes down to tread depth and the amount of water encountered. Check out our article on how to drive in the rain and avoid losing control for more information.


    Rotate Your Tires Every 5,000 Miles

    Proper tire rotation can extend the life of your tires. Stop by your local Les Schwab to have your tires rotated every 5,000 miles or six months. If any of your tires need to be replaced, our specialists will show you the options and get you safely back on the road. Schedule your tire rotation today.


    We’re Your Tire Experts

    If you have questions about installing just two new tires on your vehicle, or simply need a pre-trip safety check before your next big family adventure, stop by your local Les Schwab. We’ve been helping people get to and from locations all over the west since 1952. We can do the same for you.


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  • 4 Reasons Not to Drive Winter Tires Through Summer

    If you’re thinking of driving on your winter tires year-round, here are some reasons to rethink that.


    1. Winter Tires Can Wear Faster in Warmer Temperatures

    Winter tires are made with a special rubber compound that helps deliver maximum grip in snowy and icy conditions by staying pliable in colder temperatures. Heat is really hard on winter tires, which are meant to be used when temperatures are ~45°F or below. Winter tires that are run on hot pavement tend to wear out much faster.

    Differences between all-season and winter tires

    Winter tires are designed for traction, not longevity, whereas all-season tires are designed for lower rolling resistance and longer tread life. These tires are made with a rubber compound that is designed for a wide range of temperatures and road conditions.

    Driving winter tires in the summer can wear them out faster. That’s because the rubber compound in winter tires is designed for colder conditions, not warmer temperatures.


    2. It Will Cost You, Not Save You Money

    If you’ve made the investment in the added safety of winter tires, changing them out with a set of all-season or summer tires at the right time will help extend the service life of the winter tires — saving you money.

    Compared to all-season tires, winter tires often have a higher rolling resistance, which can cost you at the gas pump.


    3. Traction and Handling Issues

    The softer rubber compound in winter tires won’t deliver as crisp of handling as an all-season tire. Cornering, acceleration, and braking may be compromised on hot, summer roads and higher temperatures.

    When it comes to traction, lack of tread depth can be a bigger safety risk in winter. If you do use winter tires in the summer, you can expect those tires to have less tread for the following winter. That means your tires won’t channel snow, slush or water as well.


    4. Swapping Tires Can Be Easy and Free

    Swapping out winter tires for all-season or performance tires twice a year is easy. When you have Les Schwab tires on wheels, we’ll do it for free. We may even be able to store your tires at select locations.


    The Bottom Line on Driving Winter Tires All Year

    There are many tires designed for specific seasons and driving conditions. Choosing the right option can save you money and deliver peace of mind with added safety. Stop by your local Les Schwab and our pros will help you decide on the right tires for your driving needs, including winter and all-season tires.


    Shop for Summer Tires

  • 5 Questions Any Good Tire Dealer Should Ask

    Tires are a big investment most people make only every few years. If you want to make the right decision, you’ve got two choices:

    1. Become a tire selection expert.
    2. Become a tire dealer selection expert.

    Option 2 is a lot easier. Make sure the salesperson asks you these five questions:


    1. “What do you use your vehicle for?”

    The best tire for a commuter in an economy car may not be the same as what’s needed for the family car. The tire that’s best for comfort and least noise for your long-distance commute may be overkill for a third car that's used less often. If you’re hauling loads or a trailer with your truck, that suggests a different choice than what’s right on a truck used for lighter duty.

    Road conditions are a part of this equation. If you regularly go off-road, you’re driving streets with lots of potholes, or you live in a place with winding roads and tight curves, the salesperson’s recommendations will differ.


    2. “What are your driving habits?”

    If your dealer asks this question, they’re a keeper.

    Literally and figuratively, tires aren’t one-size-fits-all. For example, a new driver in the family can change the ideal tire. So can your tendency towards conservative versus faster driving.


    3. “Will you be doing any driving in winter conditions?”

    You need tires that suit the weather conditions where you drive and your dealer knows that. A good one will ask.

    All season tires are the choice for drivers in sunnier places. If you’re driving on snow or ice every year, you’ll likely have winter tires for cold months and a different set for warmer weather. Your dealer’s recommendation on what’s going to last longest and perform best will also be different if you live in a place with extremes of heat and cold than someplace with more consistent weather.

    Winter driving means winter tires. The alternative is no fun


    4. “What’s your budget?”

    All these factors — driving habits, safety, longevity, comfort, handling, noise — have to be balanced with your budget. A good dealer is happy to explain the differences between a quality, basic tire, a premium tire, and everything in between, because it narrows the choices to what's best for you. You should never get the feeling the store rep is pushing a tire just because it’s on sale or it’s the most expensive.


    5. “Here’s how our warranty works …”

    OK, it’s not really a question. But the best dealers will bring this up. If you want to get the best value for the money, it’s really important to think this through. Service warranties can include free services worth hundreds of dollars over the life a tire. They vary substantially by dealer. Some features and limitations to find out about:

    Does your service warranty cover flat tires?

    • Road hazards: If you run over a pothole, nail, or debris that damages the tire beyond repair, is the value of the tire covered?
    • Expiration: How long is the tire covered? Three years? Five years? The life of the tire?
    • Workmanship: Are both the tire and the quality of installation/repairs covered?
    • Free services: Are regular inspections for wear, tire rotations and rebalancing included? What’s the cost to fix flats?
    • Locations: How many stores will honor the warranty? The service warranty that comes with tires you buy at a dealer is an agreement with the dealer, not the manufacturer. A service warranty goes beyond the standard workmanship and material warranty you get from the company that made your tires. It can cover labor and free maintenance services. But your service warranty is good only at the retailer that sold you the tires. (If you’re weighing buying online, consider that if you get a flat, or a tire is defective, you have to get it off your vehicle and return it yourself.)

    Find the right dealer and you don’t have to become a tire expert

    Real professionals will be happy to talk your ear off about technical features — tread bars, siping, harmonic noise — or just give you the basic benefits of a tire in layperson’s language, your preference. Make sure they’re asking the questions above as a starting point. The answers will make the best choice obvious.


    Find Your Store

  • A Helpful Q&A Guide to Buying Tires

    A lot of people choose tires based on the mileage warranty and cost. However, these are only two of many important factors to consider.

    There are lots of choices between tires even at the same mileage and price point. It’s important to understand key factors to have the right tire for your driving needs. Things to ask about are: tire size, performance rating, load rating, ply rating, expected mileage and tread design, so you can depend on your tires and feel safe while traveling.

    Here are answers to questions people ask the most about how to pick out tires. This info won’t make you a tire expert but will give you the basics when you visit your tire dealer.


    Q: Do I Want All-season or Snow Tires?

    A: It depends on whether you drive in winter conditions regularly.

    Tires are categorized as all-season, summer, traction, winter or highway (for light trucks). Buying a set of highway or all-season tires is a good choice if you live in a sunny, warm climate that gets occasional rain and you aren’t regularly traveling on snow and ice. They perform well in climates where temperatures don’t typically get below 45 degrees. All-season tires are built to handle hot pavement but don’t offer the traction needed for slick, winter roads. If your area gets snow or ice every year, or if you make regular trips over mountain passes in the winter months, you’ll likely need all-season tires for spring, summer and fall driving, and snow tires for more harsh conditions. Get the full lowdown on how they’re different and how to choose winter tires.

    Winter tire versus all-season tire


    Q: Do I Want Performance Tires?

    A: Performance tires are designed for better cornering and handling at higher speeds. If these are your priorities, talk to your tire dealer about your options.

    Other specialty tires, such as traction tires for pickups and SUVs, are for off-roading, gravel and driving in mud.

    Sometimes your demands are simple; you just need a quiet, smooth passenger car tire for freeway driving. All-season or all-terrain tires are made to handle year-round driving needs on and off the blacktop. A good tire dealer will ask you the right questions and know the best product for your needs and budget.

    Les Schwab tire lineup


    Q: Does Driving Winter Tires in Summer Damage Them?

    A: Yes. With more people running studless winter tires, this is a growing issue. Winter tires are made with a special rubber compound that stays softer and more pliable in cold weather for better road grip. As seasonal tires, they aren’t designed to handle the heat. All-season tires are made with a different rubber compound suitable for hot pavement.

    If you use winter tires in hot weather they are going to wear out much quicker. It’s important to factor in the long-term cost if you’re thinking about running your winter tires through the warm months. This could reduce their life by years.


    Q: Is There Really a Difference Between Higher- and Lower-priced Tires?

    A: Definitely.

    Tire pricing is typically based on what the tire delivers for comfort, ride quality, noise level, tread durability and traction features. Some tires for specific uses. For instance, light truck mud tires may have a higher price point because they have more rubber on them, which increases the cost to produce them. Prices also reflect the value you can expect from your tire; tread life typically ranges from 30,000 to 80,000 miles. This mileage can vary depending on whether you are looking at passenger car, performance car, light truck or SUV tires.

    Eclipse tire with 70,000 mile warranty

    Thunderer Mach 4 R302 tire with 30,000 mile warranty


    Q: Who Makes the Best Tires?

    A: There are plenty of well-made tires. The biggest differences often come down to the warranty. Most of what you get in a tire warranty is provided by the dealer, not the tire maker. If there’s a defect in the tire you buy, that’s covered by the manufacturer. However, many other warranty features are covered by the dealer that sold and installed your tires.

    Les Schwab Tires tech doing warranty flat repair

    Tire service warranties vary greatly by dealer and can be worth hundreds of dollars over the life of a tire. A well-built tire is only as good as the warranty backing it, so consider everything that’s in the warranty. Here’s a list of what to look for:

    • Length of coverage. The best warranties extend for the full life of the tire’s tread mileage guarantee, not a set number of years.
    • Workmanship. Both the tire and the quality of installation/repairs should be covered.
    • Free care. Whether flat repairs, regular inspections for wear, tire rotations and rebalancing are free.
    • Road hazard coverage. If you hit debris or a pothole and the tire is damaged beyond repair, is the value of the tire covered?
    • Convenience. How many locations honor the warranty.

    Be careful about buying extended tire coverage, like tire certificates, which replace your tires for free if you ruin them. It’s very rare to damage multiple tires beyond repair over the life of the tires. Usually, damage to a tire can be repaired and often it’s a single tire that’s involved. By the time you add up the cost of covering your tires with certificates, you could pay for any tire that gets damaged.

    There are other drawbacks as well. Tire replacement certificates often expire after three years. And some aren’t honored if the damage comes from running your tires at the improper inflation.


    Q: Can I Change My Tire Size?

    A: Swapping out your tires for bigger or smaller ones than what came new on your vehicle is a fun way to change your ride’s look. Understand that it may affect performance. Be aware that when you change to a taller tire, your speedometer will read slower than you’re going because your tire is spinning fewer revolutions per mile (RPM). You may get more road noise and differences in the way your vehicle handles.

    Pickup truck with high-profile tire

    In contrast, lowering the profile of your car or truck by using a smaller tire size will alter both handling and how much clearance you have. You may bottom out on hills that you used to clear just fine and it may stiffen the ride.

    You can use a tire size calculator to see how different sized tires will affect your RPMs and tire speed, but such tools are only estimates.

    Be sure to cover all the unknowns by talking with a tire professional before you change sidewall height or tread width. An expert will know how to translate the difference in RPM, tire speed, load index and speed rating into what it will mean for your vehicle and driving. They’ll also explain how the tires or wheels you have your eye on will or won’t fit with your vehicle’s suspension, gearing and bodywork.


    Q: Is It Ok to Replace One Tire at a Time?

    A: It’s best to consider replacing tires in pairs, but read your owner’s manual. Even small size and type differences between your four tires can have big consequences, especially if you own an all-wheel drive (AWD).

    Replacing one tire with a different brand, model, size or tread depth can cause a noticeable pull in the steering wheel or other handling issues. There are tight tolerances for AWDs, so they’re at greater risk for such problems.

    A big difference in tread depth between tires can damage expensive parts. It is always a good idea to review your owner’s manual to see if the vehicle manufacturer has a point of view on this.

    Difference in distance traveled between two tire sizes


    Q: Will Buying Tires Online Save Me Money?

    A: It might save you some money if you’re a tire expert and have a place that will mount the tires on your wheels. If not and you don’t, you run the risk of getting the wrong type of tires for your vehicle and driving. Then that Internet bargain can add up to a lot more hassle, time and money than expected.

    Another issue is finding a tire dealer that will service your tires by mounting and balancing them on your wheels at a reasonable cost. This can get expensive if you’re changing out summer and winter tires twice a year. Here are some cost and warranty factors to consider when you’re thinking of buying online.

    Have other questions than what we’ve covered? See more answers in our Tire FAQ or find your local Les Schwab store to talk to a pro.

  • Do I Need Snow Tires if I Have AWD?

    You can probably safely drive your AWD (all-wheel-drive) with all-season tires in light or moderate snow. But it’s a common misperception that AWDs will drive like tanks in slick conditions.

    It’s recommended that you have either winter tires or snow chains on your AWD if you’re driving in a blizzard or icy conditions. Traveling with summer or worn all-season tires on any vehicle in winter is a safety risk. Even a 4WD (four-wheel-drive) will slip and slide on snowy roads if its tires don’t have enough tread.


    What AWD Does Really Well in Snow

    AWD is great at getting your car moving from a dead stop and accelerating smoothly in a straight line when the pavement is slippery. It’s able to do this because it sends more power to whichever wheels are getting the most traction and less power to the spinning wheels.

    But if you don’t have enough traction in the first place, the AWD system can’t compensate. If none of the four tires has enough grip, you’re in trouble.

    This is why an AWD equipped with all-season tires might not deliver safe braking and sharp cornering in significant snow or on ice. In fact, some independent testing shows that a front-wheel-drive (FWD) mounted with winter tires will have shorter stopping distance and better cornering than an AWD with all-season tires.


    How Winter Tires Provide Better Traction

    To be clear, what some people call snow tires are, in fact, winter tires built for better road grip in ALL winter conditions — rain, ice, snow and slush.

    Winter tires are made with specialized rubber that stays softer during cold temperatures. They’re designed with tread features like bigger grooves, biting edges, sipes, optional studs and variations in the block shapes for improved gripping even in subzero temperatures.

    Differences between all-season and winter tires graphic

    All-season and summer tires are made with a different rubber compound so they will maintain their shape even on hot pavement. They don’t have as many jagged surfaces and have fewer or shallower channels for ejecting water or snow.


    Are Winter Tires Worth it for AWD Vehicles?

    AWD is helpful when you’re starting to move or accelerating on slick roads, but not so much when you’re cornering or stopping. It’s not a substitute for having winter tires.

    If you’re only visiting snowy areas once or twice a year, you may be fine driving an AWD with all-season tires in good condition. Just be sure to carry tire chains.

    If it’s frigid where you live or you’re traveling in more than light snow every month, then buying a set of winter tires for your AWD will deliver the road grip you need for most winter weather conditions. Of course, you may also need a set of good chains for the worst weather.


    SHOP WINTER TIRES
  • Do You Even Need a Spare Tire?

    The fact that spare tires are no longer standard equipment on many newer-model cars can come as a nasty surprise when you get a flat tire. While most new light trucks and larger SUVs still come with a spare, here’s important news:

    About 35 percent of vehicles now come from the factory without a spare tire.

    Getting a flat tire is a major hassle and it can be costly. Here’s what to know about spares, including why more autos are coming without them, how to decide if you really need one and the upsides and downsides of inflator kits.


    Which New Car & SUV Models Don’t Include a Spare?

    There’s no complete source for finding out, but the number is growing. See partial lists of spare-less vehicle models here and here.

    The time to find out if your new or used car is going to come equipped with a spare is before you sign on the dotted line. Don’t rely on the sales staff to volunteer the news. It can be difficult to tell which models come with a spare and which don’t, since some trim levels will, but not all. Be sure by asking the sales rep directly. (And if you’ve recently bought a newer model car, be sure to check whether it has a spare, so you’re prepared with an alternative in case of a flat.)


    Why Aren’t Some New Cars Coming With Spare Tires?

    A bunch of factors are in play.

    1. Efforts to improve fuel efficiency. Removing the spare can reduce a vehicle’s weight by about 30 to 50 pounds, once you include the jack and wrench. It can also improve aerodynamics by reducing air drag from spare tire compartments that poke below the undercarriages of vehicles. These two factors can improve miles per gallon performance and help carmakers meet strict EPA standards for their full fleets, an attractive option for both car companies and energy-conscious drivers.

    2. Need for more space in smaller vehicles. A spare can take up significant room in compacts, sports cars and small sedans. There can be a trade-off between comfort and the space in small cars.

    3. Lack of storage space, especially in hybrids, diesels and electric vehicles. Batteries and emissions equipment for such vehicles sometimes now take up space where the spare used to go.

    4. Reduced manufacturing costs. Yep, a carmaker can save several hundred dollars by foregoing the spare in new cars.

    What Are Alternatives to a Spare Tire? Are They Any Good?

    Some new cars are coming from the factory equipped with tires or inflator kits that claim to make the spare tire unnecessary. There are upsides and downsides to all.

    Run-flat tires are designed to allow driving for a limited distance after losing air from a typical puncture. They are built with either a reinforced sidewall or an internal support ring to carry the vehicle’s weight if the tire tread gets pierced. (The sidewall is the curbside face of the tire.)

    Run-flats are made to travel from 10 to 50 miles under 50 mph when deflated, so you can get somewhere for service. Run-flats may also offer better control than standard tires when there’s a tire failure involving complete loss of air.

    Downsides: Driving on a run-flat for even the shortest of distances will ruin the tire. It will have to be replaced. Plus, if you’re somewhere remote and get a flat, you may not be within range of the next tire repair shop.

    Flat tire

    Self-sealing tires have a lining coated with special sealant inside the tire. When an object on the road pierces the tread, the sealant material "surrounds" the hole. Then when a nail or other debris is removed, the sealant fills the full area.

    Downsides: The self-sealing tire won't work if a puncture is more than about a quarter of an inch in diameter. They also don’t work for sidewall holes, so if an object goes through the tread to the sidewall you’re going to have a dead flat and won’t be going anywhere.

    Inflator kits are a growing — but less-than-ideal — substitute to the spare tire. New autos with standard tires sometimes come with an aerosol seal kit. Such products offer a very temporary fix for minor tread punctures so you can get to a nearby tire store or service station for repairs.

    Some are as simple as $10 canned products that plug small puncture holes by spraying sealant into the flat via the air-inflation valve and inflating the tire just a bit. Other tire-sealant kits include a small air cartridge and a replaceable container of sealant at a cost between $20 to $80.

    Downsides: Tire sealant kits only work on small holes in the tread, and they don’t work at all for slits or holes in the sidewall.

    Sealants also leave grime inside the tire that can affect your TPMS (tire pressure monitoring system), the safety equipment that alerts you if you’ve lost air in a tire. Any time you use a sealant you’ll need to have the TPMS sensors in your tires cleaned. And sealants can easily damage these sensors. You’re looking at a cost of $45 to $100 per tire if they need to be replaced.


    When Is It OK to Go Without a Spare Tire? And Not?

    If you’re buying a new car, here are five tips for deciding whether to get a model with no spare, based on where you live, what type of driving you’re doing, cost, safety and convenience.

    1. The freeway shoulder can be a dangerous place to change a tire. If you live in an urban area with 24-hour towing, and you’re doing mostly daytime driving, you may be good with no spare. Just be sure you have AAA towing service ($69 a year for the basic package), roadside assistance coverage included in your auto insurance policy, or one of the new, on-demand services. Without it, a standard tow (around 5 miles) will cost you an average $109, according to Angie’s List.

    2. Decide up front if you’re willing to go spare-less for the life of your vehicle. If you find yourself regretting your decision later, you’ll pay more for an aftermarket tire, jack and lug wrench (typically $150 to $300) than you do when the kit comes as original equipment on a new car. Plus, there may not be a space to safely carry them in your vehicle if you bought a spare-less auto model.

    3. If you take a lot of road trips, routinely drive in places with long distances between service stations, or travel a lot on rougher roads, you need a spare tire. Getting a flat in rural areas means you could be a hundred miles or more to the nearest repair shop. If it’s after business hours, you could be looking at being marooned for hours, paying for a hotel for a night (or more if it’s a weekend), leaving a vehicle loaded with gear or belongings on the side of the road, and paying a hefty towing fee over a long stretch of highway.
    1. Get a spare tire if you travel with small kids, especially if you're taking occasional road trips. Getting stranded with a flat and no spare can mean several hours of waiting for a tow, even in an urban area. This is sure to be stressful for parents and possibly unsafe for tots, especially if it’s a really hot or frigid day.

    2. If you have medical needs that need daily attention, better have a spare.

    Flat tires can be a major, costly hassle — or simply a slight inconvenience. Especially in the West, where distances between tire service can be long and lonely, a spare tire is the most cost-effective insurance that you won’t get stuck by the side of the road.

    Les Schwab Tires provides free flat tire repairs on all tires purchased. Find a store.

  • Guide to Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems

    TPMS icon

    Notice to our customers: Important changes affecting vehicles equipped with Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems have been put into place.

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    What Is a Tire Pressure Monitoring System?

    TPMS stands for Tire Pressure Monitoring System. It is a feature on many late model vehicles that monitors tire pressure and warns the driver, with a light on the dash, if one or more of the tires’ pressure falls 25% below the original equipment manufacturer’s recommended tire pressure.

    See the questions below to learn more about TPMS, and how to check if your vehicle is equipped with TPMS.


    Why does TPMS exist?

    As a result of tire-related safety concerns, Congress passed the TREAD Act in 2000. The TREAD Act requires vehicle manufacturers to install TPMS in new vehicles with a gross vehicle weight of 10,000 pounds or less.

    What vehicles have it?

    Passenger cars, SUVs, and light trucks. TPMS has been progressively introduced in new vehicles since 2005. Refer to your owner’s manual for more information.

    How do I check to see if my vehicle has it?

    When you start your vehicle, look at the dash for the TPMS warning lamp. If you see the warning lamp light up momentarily, your vehicle is equipped with TPMS.

    What does it mean when the warning lamp is on?

    The warning lamp should light up briefly when the vehicle is started. But if the light stays on, that means tire pressure is low in one or more of the tires, or the system is not able to read the sensors. In this case, you should have your tire air pressure checked. We provide this service for free at all of our Les Schwab locations.

    What kind of maintenance is required on my TPMS?

    Replacement or relocation of a TPMS sensor, or sometimes even just inflating a tire may cause the TPMS to get out of whack. Generally, recalibration is easy to perform: we provide this service to customers free at all Les Schwab Tire Centers.

    Does this mean I don’t need to check my tire pressure?

    Regardless of TPMS, we recommend tire pressure checks every 30 days. Properly maintained tire pressure decreases tire wear and improves vehicle safety, handling, braking and fuel mileage. Come in anytime for a free air check.


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  • How Do I Check My Tire Pressure?

    Low tire pressure can be an expensive proposition, costing you hundreds of dollars a year in lost fuel economy and prematurely worn tires. Add to that, decreased handling and an increased risk in tire failure, and it’s easy to understand why maintaining proper tire pressure is so important. Tires naturally lose 1 to 2 pounds of pressure a month. Cool temperatures cause even more pressure loss. So it’s important to check your vehicle’s tire pressure regularly.

    We recommend you check your tire pressure at least once a month or twice a month in the winter.


    Using an Air Pressure Gauge

    Here’s how you go about it with an air pressure gauge, can be found at most any auto parts store.

    Standard cold tire inflation pressure information

    First, look in the owner’s manual or on the inside placard of the driver’s side door for the standard cold tire inflation pressure. This number is the PSI, or Pounds Per Square Inch, you will inflate your tires to, as suggested by the car’s manufacturer.

    Next, unscrew the cap from the valve stem on the tire.

    Tech checks tire pressure

    Now, press the air pressure gauge onto the valve stem and record the reading given. If there’s a hissing sound, try re-seating the gauge for a tighter fit and more accurate reading. Note that if the reading on all four tires is the same as the manual’s specifications, you’re done. If any of the tires have inadequate pressure, add air until they’re properly filled. Make sure you put in the correct amount by rechecking the pressure in each tire after refilling.

    Finally, replace the valve stem cap to protect the valve mechanism from dirt and moisture.

    While you’re at it, check the pressure on your spare tire, as well. You never know when you might need it.

    Follow along as we show you how in this video:


    Or you can simply stop by your nearest Les Schwab Tire Center, where we not only check tire pressure for you but also adjust it, if necessary. Free of charge.

    Have any questions about tire pressure? One of our experts will be happy to help.

  • How Do I Know If My Tires Need to Be Balanced?

    Tire balancing is a tune-up for your wheel-tire set. It makes sure that weight is evenly distributed around the entire circumference of the unit. The common symptoms of out-of-balance tires are uneven and faster tread wear, poor fuel economy, and vibration in the steering wheel, the floorboard or the seat that gets worse at faster speeds.

    When all areas of the wheel-tire unit are as equal in weight as possible, the tire will roll smoothly. This helps it wear evenly, for longest life. Balancing also contributes to ride comfort: Imbalanced tires will wobble or hop up and down, which causes vibration. If a front tire isn’t properly balanced you’ll likely feel vibration in the steering wheel. If the problem is in the rear the tremor will be noticeable in the seat or floor.

    Imbalanced tires are easily corrected, but the work is precise. It’s done by attaching small weights, just fractions of ounces, to the wheel.


    How Do Wheels Get Out of Balance?

    Everyday wear on tires will contribute to imbalance. Normal manufacturing imperfections are also a cause: Tires and wheels don’t have precisely equal weight distribution. They’ll be slightly heavier in some spots.

    Just half an ounce in weight difference is enough to cause a vibration when you’re driving.


    How Tires Are Rebalanced

    Rebalancing is done in a tire shop by putting the wheel-tire unit on a tire balancing machine that takes measurements to pinpoint lighter or heavier areas and making adjustments to account for these weight differences. The best time to get it done is when tires are being rotated, both for convenience and because you might have a tire out of balance on the rear of the vehicle and won’t feel it until it is moved to the front.

    Here’s how it’s done:

    1. A tire mounted on a wheel is attached to a tire balancing machine.

    2. The wheel is spun while vibration measurements are taken. This tells the tech if the weight is spread evenly, how much weight to add and where on the wheel to attach it.

    3. If an imbalance is found, the technician may be able to rebalance and adjust the weights (adding more). But sometimes it requires the tech to also move the tire on the wheel and then rebalance. This is because a heavy spot on the wheel and on the tire can sometimes line up together, causing a greater imbalance that needs to be corrected.

    Wheel weight on tire


    Balancing Versus Alignment

    Though both should be part of regular auto maintenance, balancing isn’t the same as getting an alignment. Alignment is about correcting the angles of the tires so they’re properly positioned in relationship to each other and to the road. It gets the wheels all traveling in the same direction and makes sure the tires make contact with the ground as they should.


    When to Get Tire Balancing Done:

    • You feel vibration in the steering wheel, the floorboard or your seat.
    • You get them rotated, generally every 5,000 miles.
    • At the very least every two years, once yearly if you drive rough roads.
    • You get a flat and repair a tire.
    • You buy any new tire(s).
    • A weight that used to be on the rim falls off.
    • You notice uneven tire wear.

    Vibration when underway could be caused by an imbalanced tire and wheel assembly or something else — a bent wheel, a damaged tire (which won’t be fixed by balancing), worn suspension parts or other aging components. If you feel a vibration, don’t wait to get it diagnosed. You’ll head off other problems — and enjoy a smoother ride — when your tires are well balanced.


    Schedule an Appointment
  • How Do I Know When I Need New Tires?

    The primary functions of tread are to divert water from beneath the tire, to improve traction and to avoid hydroplaning on wet roads. As tire tread wears down, it becomes less reliable. Find out when you need new tires in this video, or read about it below.


    Tires become completely unsafe when they’re worn down to 116 of an inch. Many people prefer to replace their tires even sooner, especially when driving in adverse weather conditions.

    Tire tread measurement


    Check Your Tread Wear Bars

    All tires sold in the United States today have what are called tread wear bars. These are small raised bars of rubber in the grooves of your tire. Look at the tread pattern and you’ll see these bars running between the tread blocks. As your tires wear, these bars will become flush with the tire’s tread. When this happens, it’s time to replace the tires.

    Tire Wear Bars


    Do a Penny Test

    An easy way to check the tread on your tires is to do the penny test. Take a penny and place Lincoln’s head in one of the grooves of the tire tread. If you can see all of Lincoln’s head, it’s time to replace the tire.

    Penny test to measure tread

    If the penny goes in enough that the tire tread is at least as deep as Lincoln’s forehead, your tires are generally considered safe and do not need replacing. Make sure when you’re administering the penny test that you check all four of your tires.

    While you’re at it, check a few spots on each tire to look for any irregular tread wear. This could indicate a wheel misalignment, need for tire rotation or both. Talk to one of our tire experts if you think your tires are wearing unevenly.


    SHOP TIRES
  • How to Change a Tire

    Changing a flat tire isn’t rocket science, but there are some important things to know to make sure you get that spare on properly in order to make it safely to the tire shop. Follow along as we show you, step by step, how to do it in this Les Schwab Quick Tips video. We cover:

    1. What to do before you get tools out.

    2. How to find the proper jacking point on your vehicle.

    3. How much to loosen lug nuts before lifting the car.

    4. How to make sure the spare goes on correctly.

    5. The proper order for tightening lug nuts.


    How to Change a Tire

    1. Safety first. Keep clear of passing traffic, make sure your car is in park, set your parking brake and turn on your hazard lights. If there’s any doubt about whether you can stay out of harm’s way, it’s better to call roadside assistance.

    2. Check your owner’s manual. It should have tire-changing instructions, including the location of the jacking point.

    3. Get your spare and tools out. They are usually stored in a compartment inside the trunk. There should also be instructions on how to use the jack.

    4. Be sure the jack is positioned properly. Make sure it’s pointed the right way and placed in the proper jacking point on the vehicle.

    5. Loosen lug nuts about a one-quarter turn before jacking.

    6. Jack the vehicle up enough so the tire is not touching the ground.

    7. Remove the lug nuts, setting them somewhere where they won’t roll away.

    8. Pull the flat tire off, placing it underneath your vehicle behind the jack or, if it’s too wide to fit there, in another spot under the auto if possible. This is important in case the vehicle falls off the jack.

    9. Put the spare on, making sure the valve stem is facing you.

    10. Screw the lugs nuts back on by hand, finger tight.

    11. Lower the jack down until the tire contacts the road and is bearing some weight, but not all the way.

    12. Tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern, not a circle pattern, so the wheel gets seated snugly. This assures the wheel isn’t askew, and doesn’t then pop into the proper place while you’re going down the road, loosening some of the bolts and causing wobbling or worse — like the nuts breaking and the wheel coming off.
    Proper order for four lug nuts.
    Proper order for five lug nuts.
Proper order for six lug nuts.
Proper order for eight lug nuts.